Thursday, August 13, 2015

Pop, Twist, Furl, Twirl

A little technique review this week. This technique is called many things. I happen to call it 'furling,' a term I first heard and started using when I learned hand-piecing. So the technique isn't new, in fact it's tried and true. The technique is perhaps best known for four-patch blocks, especially pinwheel blocks.

Several seams coming together at a center point can make for bulky, lumpy seam intersections. With furling, pieced seams are pressed to one side, then pressed open and twirled at the block's seam intersection.

For this first part in a multi-part series, the focus is on furling a four-patch block.

One little given: I'm not a fan of pressing seams open in pieced blocks. There are lots of reasons for my position, which I'll save for another day (or you can find my reasoning in my books!). Now, I realize there are some exceptions, but in my mind, those exceptions are very rare. So, if you subscribe to pressing seams open, the whole furling process goes out the window.

The fabulous Four-Patch

A four-patch block typically starts with two two-patches. Each with a seam pressed (usually) to the darker of the two fabrics. The two-patches might be cross cut from strip-pieced units or could start with plain old squares. When the four-patch is made from four same-sized square, the two patch seams are short. The seam to connect the two two-patches is longer. Notice that the two-patch seams are opposing (red arrows) so the four-patch seam will nest and oppose (snap together) when sewn.


furl quilt block



Once the four-patch seam is sewn and before the block is pressed, with a seam ripper, pull out the last few stitches of the two-patch seam in between the longer four-patch seam and the edge of the fabric. Do that on both sides of the block. And in reality, you don't HAVE to use a seam ripper to pull out the stitches, sometimes the stitches will just 'pop' when you go to furl.


furl quilt block



Now place the block on the ironing board, right side down. Use the existing seams (dotted line arrows) to determine the rotation of the block seams. The remaining two seams (solid red arrows) should complete the rotation. Notice that the whole press-the-seam-to-the-dark-fabric goes bye-bye at this point. Half the seams will be pressed to the darker fabric (in this case, the green) and the other two seams will be pressed toward the lighter fabric (in this case, the cream print).


furl quilt block



As you push the seams to complete the rotation, notice how the removed stitches in the center allow the center to open up or 'bloom' . . . .


furl quilt block



At this point, with the tip of your iron, flatten the block seams. Then flip the block right side up and give the block one last sweep of the iron.


furl quilt block



While the seams don't necessarily follow the press-to-the-darker fabric rule, if all the blocks are sewn the same way, the bonus is that the blocks will 'nest' as they are sewn next to each other. A perfect example of this process is found in the very popular Bloomin' Steps quilt.


furl quilt block



You can see how the block seams will nest nicely from this back view. And guess what, when you sew the blocks together, the seam intersection between the blocks can be furled, too!


furl quilt block



Another furling bonus: it works on four-patch blocks of any size! Rectangular blocks, too, as long as the seams come together in one place.


furl quilt block


More on furling next time!

Happy Stitching!
Joan

19 comments:

  1. Thank you for this post. Keep it up. Hope to read more post from you guys.

    Swaine
    www.gofastek.com

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  2. seguiré paso a paso las indicaciones que son clarísimas, y luego te cuento como me fue!

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    1. You are welcome! I hope you like this technique!

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  3. Oh my gosh, many times shown to me, many times I've tried and failed with any consistency! This explanation is perfection to me. THANK YOU. I know I can now furl any seam that meets that comes my way. Printing and saving for future referral.

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    1. You are most welcome. You can be the next furling queen!

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  4. Muchisimas gracias por el consejo. Un abrazo.

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  5. Muchisimas gracias por el consejo. Un abrazo.

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  6. Thank you. I think I've got it at long last. Furling suddenly makes a lot of sense! Now I can finish the first block of The Splendid Sampler.

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  7. I've been looking for some really helpful tips on pressing lately. This is great thanks. I may link to it in my blog!

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  8. I am so pleased that you put together this tutorial. I haven't been quilting very long, and have tried mashing, pounding, book pressing, etc. seams together in failed attempts to flatten them. This is so much better! Have a truly splendid day, Karen

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    1. Thanks, Karen. Yes, so much better!

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  10. Joan - I have your books out on library loan. So very helpful, and inspiring me to continue my own organization of scraps. I found that I was already doing a lot of what you teach us. Yeah!! So now I am sharing my knowledge with others. Thanks for your efforts in good clear examples! A sign of a good teacher! Irene Krall

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  11. I don't know if this is a dumb question, but - rather than undoing a couple of stitches on those two seams, could I just skip a couple of stitches when sewing the seam, and maybe begin with a couple of tiny stitches that would keep it from coming undone more?

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    1. I have never tried that. I guess, I don't want to think that hard when I'm piecing the two-patches. I'd have to know which end of the seam will be in the center of the four-patch. And then I'd have to change stitch length in the middle of a seam. It takes a half-second to pop the seams out, and I do think there's something to be said for the seam that crosses over the seam to be furled. It may add a little stability. If you try it, let me know how it works out. . .

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